Health Professionals

Our research

Helping health care teams better meet patients’ needs

Health research often happens in experimental settings that differ from clinics and hospitals where most Americans get their care. But at Group Health Research Institute, we study care as it’s delivered to a real-world population of health plan members over time. We collaborate with health care teams at Group Health and beyond to ensure that we’re asking the right questions—and that our findings can be used to improve everyday patient care.

Through our MacColl Center for Health Care Innovation, we’re helping to transform care nationwide by developing and testing innovative models of care, and providing the training and technical assistance that health care teams need to better meet patients’ needs.

Our scientists study health care as it happens in everyday clinics and hospitals, turning research into better health for patients everywhere.


Your practice

Rainier Medical Center offers mindfulness class to women of color

Drs. Lin and Holland bring affordable mindfulness-based stress reduction to African American, Latina, and Asian American women with chronic diseases in Seattle.

Read it in Healthy Findings.

Team care for teen depression is found cost-effective

Dr. Evette Ludman describes how collaborative care pays off for adolescents who have depression.

Read it in Healthy Findings.

Research news

Grossman: Closing the knowledge gap on prevention in pediatrics

Does routine screening for autism, high cholesterol, and other problems improve kids’ health? We need better research to find out, Dr. Grossman says.

Read it in Healthy Findings.

Group Health’s guidelines helped our Group Practice reduce doses of opioids for chronic pain

Dr. Michael Von Korff discusses how Washington state guidelines also appeared to lower opioid doses, but large dose reductions followed health plan initiatives.

Read it in Healthy Findings.

GHRI In the Media

Higher dementia risk linked to more use of common drugs

Long term use of common OTC drugs can increase dementia risk

KING5 TV, Jan. 26, 2015

More news